Reaching the Healthier Bay Tipping Point by 2025

Overall Progress

0%

Progressing

Certified Cover Crops (Acres Planted)

FY 2014
407,541
Acres
FY 2006
124,800
Acres
226.5% Increase

Stormwater Retrofits (Pounds of Nitrogen Removed)

FY 2014
239,583
Pounds
FY 2006
74,706
Pounds
220.7% Increase

Natural Filters on Private Lands (Acres)

FY 2014
114356
Acres
FY 2006
79,519
Acres
43.8% Increase
This site was last updated on December 5, 2014.

Certified Cover Crops Annually Planted in Chesapeake Bay Watershed

Stormwater Retrofits (Pounds of Nitrogen Removed)

Natural Filters on Private Lands (Acres)

Wastewater Treatment Plants Retrofitted for Enhanced Nutrient Removal

Maps

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In-State Renewable Energy Generating Capacity (Actual and Projected)

Are We Meeting Our Goals?

The Chesapeake Bay is a unique and irreplaceable environmental and cultural resource. A healthy Chesapeake Bay benefits Maryland's tourism, recreation, agriculture and fisheries industries; improves the value of our homes, farms and businesses; and creates green jobs. The Bay’s problems are man-made. So too are its solutions. Maryland is leading the way in meeting its goal of reaching the Healthier Bay Tipping Point by 2025.  The tipping point is the stage at which progress within the Bay and its tributaries can begin to promote self-healing.  Maryland developed a Watershed Implementation Plan (WIP), which lays out its strategy for achieving a healthy Bay by 2025. The state set up two-year milestones for the 43 specific, measurable actions and associated goals for reducing pollution, restoring habitats, and fostering smarter, greener growth and living in Maryland. Tracking this incremental progress ensures we are on track to meet our 2025 goal. Maryland met the first 2009-2011 two-year milestone goals and more recently the EPA issued the 2012-2013 Milestone progress evaluation showing Maryland met the two year milestones for nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment reduction again. Progress on each strategy and its associated goal can be found at our BayStat page.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL), a historic and comprehensive “pollution diet” that establishes healthy limits on key pollutants entering the Bay. This TMDL – the largest ever developed by EPA – identifies the necessary pollution reductions of nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment across Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia and the District of Columbia and sets pollution limits necessary to meet applicable water quality standards in the Bay and its tidal rivers and embayments. Using the EPA’s Chesapeake Bay Model, the overall TMDL was subdivided for each State. To meet its TMDL, Maryland tracks the various mitigation actions, such as planting forest buffers to stop sediment from entering the Bay, included in its Watershed Implementation Plan (WIP).  See all of the actions taken at BayStat.

 

Actions Taken Towards Goal

  • The EPA evaluation of Maryland's 2012-2013 Milestone Progress showed Maryland exceeded its nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment reduction goals for the two year milestone period. Maryland is 3.5 million pounds of nitrogen, 147,000 pounds of phosphorus, and 90 million pounds of sediment ahead of schedule. 
  • Maryland facilitated the planting of 404,072 acres of cover crops in 2013.  While weather caused a slight decline in total acres from the record year in 2012, a record 1,860 farmers participated, 152 of whom were new to the program year. In 2014, the cover crop program posted the fourth straight year of more than 400,000 certified acres.
  •  Maryland has upgraded 34 wastewater treatment plants to include enhanced nutrient removal which greatly improves their efficiency.
  • The State launched Marylanders Plant Trees in 2009 to encourage citizens and organizations to partner with the State to plant new trees. As of June 2014 the program facilitated more than 111,628 tree plantings, exceeding the goal of 100,000 trees by the end of 2012. In addition, on May 2011 the Maryland inmates’ Forest Brigade planted the one-millionth tree on public lands.
  • Maryland passed the Healthy Air Act which required major reductions in air pollutants to be phased in at Maryland power plants starting in 2009 with additional reductions in 2012 and 2013. At full implementation, the Healthy Air Act will reduce nitrogen oxide emissions by approximately 75 percent and sulfur dioxide emissions by approximately 85 percent from 2002 levels. This will keep more than 330,000 pounds of nitrogen out of Chesapeake Bay annually.

How Can I Get Involved?

  • Track up to date water quality monitoring data at the Eyes on The Bay page.
  • All of our data are publicly available. Feel free to explore the graphs and data on BayStat.
  • Use the Socrata Open Data API (SODA) to build applications with Maryland's data.

Where Did We Get Our Data?

Here is the main backing data set for this page. It contains all of the data used to make the tables and graphs, plus even more numbers. Please explore and share the data; it's all public!

How Can I Get Involved?

  • Track up to date water quality monitoring data at the Eyes on The Bay page.
  • All of our data are publicly available. Feel free to explore the graphs and data on BayStat.
  • Use the Socrata Open Data API (SODA) to build applications with Maryland's data.

Where Did We Get Our Data?

Here is the main backing data set for this page. It contains all of the data used to make the tables and graphs, plus even more numbers. Please explore and share the data; it's all public!

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