End Childhood Hunger in Maryland by 2015

Overall Progress

61.2% of Children Eligible for Free/Reduced Price Lunch Eating a Free/ Reduced Price Breakfast at School Every Day

Progressing

Breakfast Penetration Rate

School Year 2013 / 2014
61.2%
School Year 2007 / 2008
44.6%
37.0% Increase

At-Risk Afterschool Meals Penetration Rate

School Year 2013 / 2014
8.1%
School Year 2009 / 2010
1.5%
440% Increase

Summer Food Service Program Penetration Rate

Summer 2013
26.9%
Summer 2008
17.2%
56.0% Increase
This site was last updated on July 1, 2014.

Breakfast Meals Program: Annual Penetration Rates

Breakfast Meals Program: Monthly Penetration Rates

At-Risk Afterschool Meals Program: Penetration Rates

Summer Food Service Program: Penetration Rates

Food Supplement Program (FSP): Penetration Rates

Women, Infants and Children (WIC) Program: Penetration Rates

Maps

For a map of all Maryland primary schools' participation in breakfast and lunch programs, please click here.

Food Stamp Map  Percentage of Free/Reduced Lunch Students Also Receiving Breakfast

In-State Renewable Energy Generating Capacity (Actual and Projected)

Are We Meeting Our Goals?

The O’Malley-Brown Administration set an ambitious goal to end childhood hunger in Maryland by 2015.  In 2008 we launched the Partnership to End Childhood Hunger in Maryland in collaboration with our public, private and non-profit partners to connect children and families with food assistance programs and drive down hunger.

Maryland’s primary strategy to end childhood hunger is to ensure that at least 70 percent of children eating a free/reduced (F/R) school lunch are also eating a F/R school breakfast every day by 2015.  In 2007, less than half of students who ate a F/R school lunch also ate a school breakfast each day.  Today, 62 percent of the students who eat a F/R lunch also start their day with a school breakfast.  That’s a 38 percent increase in six years.

StateStat uses participation levels in several additional metrics to track Maryland’s progress in ending childhood hunger including  the At-Risk Afterschool Meals Program, the Summer Food Service Program, the Food Supplement Program (SNAP or formerly known as the Food Stamp Program), and the Women, Infants, and Children Program (WIC).

StateStat measures participation levels by analyzing each program’s penetration rate.  The penetration rates are calculated by dividing these programs’ average daily participation rates by the participation rates for the F/R Lunch Program. Participation in the F/R Lunch Program is calculated by dividing the average daily participation rates by the total number of eligible children under 18 in Maryland. Data on the total number of eligible children are available in this datasetIncome eligibility guidelines are determined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and adopted by the Maryland State Department of Education.  Penetration rates for SNAP and WIC are calculated by dividing the total number of children participating in these programs by the total number eligible. 

Actions Taken Towards Goal

  • In August 2013, the Benefit Data Trust together with the Maryland Department of Human Resources (DHR), began a new program allowing Maryland families to enroll in the SNAP program over the phone expediting the application process and reducing barriers to participation.
  • With our partners in the Partnership to End Childhood Hunger, the O’Malley-Brown Administration launched the First Class Breakfast Initiative in 2010 to increase the number of children eating breakfast at school each day.  The Initiative removes common barriers preventing students from eating breakfast such as a lack of time in the morning or peer pressure from classmates by offering alternative delivery methods.  Today, over 170 schools participate in the First Class Breakfast Initiative offering their students breakfast in the classroom, a “grab and go” breakfast and/or breakfast after 1st period. 
  • The O’Malley-Brown Administration has invested recorded funding in Maryland Meals for Achievement.   In FY14, the Administration invested $1.8 million in the program bringing our total investment to $5.2 million.  The innovative program provides free breakfast for all students in a qualifying school.  To qualify, 40 percent or more of a school’s student body must be eligible for a free or reduced school lunch.
  • In 2009, Maryland was chosen as one of the pilot states for the At-Risk Afterschool Meals Program.  The Program reimburses afterschool programs who serve nutritious meals to students during the school year, including weekends and holidays.  In 2013, an average of 21,800 students participated in the At-Risk Afterschool Meals Program each day up from just 4,900 in 2012. 
  • Last summer, together with our community partners, we served more than 2.8 million meals to Maryland children through the Summer Food Service Program. That’s a 22 percent increase from the 2.3 million meals served in 2012.
  • Throughout Maryland last summer, local jurisdictions piloted programs to increase children’s access to summer meals.  Montgomery County Public Schools’ pilot program provided hot meals in a school cafeteria location serving 650 hot meals a day.  Multiple counties used mobile routes to bring meals to children at housing developments, parks and pools including Anne Arundel, Baltimore City, Charles, and Prince George’s Counties.
  • The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) continues to exceed the USDA’s goals for women and children served through WIC.  Through a series of outreach campaigns, WIC participants can now redeem their vouchers for fruit and vegetables at farmer’s markets throughout the state. 

How Can I Get Involved?

For Parents/Guardians:

For Teachers

  • Read more about hunger in the classroom in Share Our Strength's Teachers Report.
  • Are you a teacher in an MMFA school? To find additional resources and background on the program, click here.
  • To connect your students to your nearest summer meals location at the end of each school year click here

Resources for Schools and Community Organizations

Additional Information

More Data

The data displayed above are contained in three datasets: the first covers Breakfast, Lunch and At-Risk Afterschool Programs, the second only covers the Summer Food Service Program, and the third covers the Food Supplement Program and Women, Infants and Children Program. Please explore and share the data; it’s all public!

How Can I Get Involved?

For Parents/Guardians:

For Teachers

  • Read more about hunger in the classroom in Share Our Strength's Teachers Report.
  • Are you a teacher in an MMFA school? To find additional resources and background on the program, click here.
  • To connect your students to your nearest summer meals location at the end of each school year click here

Resources for Schools and Community Organizations

More Data

The data displayed above are contained in three datasets: the first covers Breakfast, Lunch and At-Risk Afterschool Programs, the second only covers the Summer Food Service Program, and the third covers the Food Supplement Program and Women, Infants and Children Program. Please explore and share the data; it’s all public!

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