Reduce Overdose Deaths by 20% by the End of 2015

Overall Progress

-7.4% Progress towards Accidental or Undetermined Intoxication Death Reduction Goal of 20 percent in Maryland

Lagging

Accidental or Undetermined Intoxication Deaths

2013
858
Deaths
2012
799
Deaths
7.4% Increase

Average Daily Patients in State-Sponsored Treatment

2013
25,774
Patients

Drug or Alcohol-Induced Crashes

2013
7,321
Crashes
2012
7,672
Crashes
This site was last updated on December 14, 2014.

Annual Overdose Deaths

Average Daily-Active Patients in State-Sponsored Treatment Programs

Monthly Overdose Deaths

Drug Intoxication Deaths by Selected Substances

Maps

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In-State Renewable Energy Generating Capacity (Actual and Projected)

Are We Meeting Our Goals?

Drug overdoses have become a serious public health challenge in Maryland and across the country.  Recognizing the impact substance abuse and overdose deaths have on the state of Maryland and its residents, the O’Malley-Brown Administration set a goal of reducing overdose deaths by 20 percent by the end of 2015.  StateStat is regularly analysing progress towards the goal through the use of overdose death related data and information supplied to the Virtual Data Unit by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. 

Over the last seven years, the O’Malley-Brown Administration has worked to expand substance abuse services, achieving a 25 percent increase by the end of FY2012.  Data from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) show that we surpassed our substance abuse treatment goal by the end of FY2012.  In FY2012, 22,431 patients received state-sponsored treatment in Maryland up 26 percent from 17,809 patients in FY2008. 

Actions Taken Towards Goal

  • On June 27th, 2014, Governor Martin O’Malley signed an executive order announcing the formation of the Overdose Prevention Council to counter the increase in the number of overdose deaths. As another component of Maryland’s efforts to address the overdose epidemic, the Council current meets regularly, advising and assisting in establishing a coordinated effort among multiple State agencies to reduce the number of fatal and non-fatal overdoses in Maryland.
  • In the summer of 2014, in conjunction with the release of the 2013 Annual Report: Drug and Alcohol-Related Intoxication Deaths in Maryland, DHMH launched a statewide public education campaign to raise awareness about opioid overdoses. DHMH is partnering with local health departments to distribute posters, pamphlets, and emergency cards to assist those seeking information on the education and prevention of opioid overdoses. DHMH has launched a Facebook page on substance use disorders as a venue to distribute current information and share stories from residents across the state who are dealing with addiction.
  • This year regulations for the Overdose Response Program have gone into effect expanding the number of local programs training and certifying individuals to administer Naloxone, a life saving opioid antagonist. DHMH is currently working with applicants for these programs from around the state.Pilot Local Overdose Fatality Review Teams have been established in Baltimore City and Cecil and Wicomico Counties. The multidisciplinary teams will examine cases of overdose fatalities through a process of data sharing, with the goal of identifying potential systemic changes which could lead to preventing future fatalities. The teams began meeting in February 2014. 
  • Fully launched in December 2013, Maryland’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) monitors the prescribing and dispensing of Schedule II-V Controlled Dangerous Substances including the most commonly used opioid analgesics and makes a patient’s prescription history available in real-time to healthcare providers. Among other things, the PDMP will make obtaining prescription drugs illegally more difficult and will help prevent harmful prescription drug interactions. 
  • In 2013, all Maryland counties and Baltimore city submitted local overdose prevention plans to the state in an effort to supplement the statewide plan. DHMH is supporting the counties in their implementation efforts and tracking their progress. 
  • In 2013, DHMH began implementing the Maryland Opioid Overdose Prevention Plan focusing on: enhancing epidemiology; continuing to expand access to and the effectiveness of substance abuse treatment; supporting local public health action; addressing pharmaceutical opioid overdoses through clinical education/training, the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program and a Controlled Dangerous Substance Integration Unit; expanding the use of naloxone; and developing an emergency response plan in the event of an abrupt change in the prescribing, dispensing or use of opioids at the community level.

How Can I Get Involved?

  • Click here to find out more information on Overdose Prevention
  • Click here to find out information specific to Maryland's new Overdose Response Program
  • Click here to find out how to dispose of unused or unwanted medications year round  
  • What is the Overdose Prevention Plan for my county?  

Additional Information

Where Did We Get Our Data?

Here is the main backing data set for this page. It contains all of the data used to make the tables and graphs, plus even more numbers. Please explore and share the data; it's all public!

How Can I Get Involved?

  • Click here to find out more information on Overdose Prevention
  • Click here to find out information specific to Maryland's new Overdose Response Program
  • Click here to find out how to dispose of unused or unwanted medications year round  
  • What is the Overdose Prevention Plan for my county?  

Where Did We Get Our Data?

Here is the main backing data set for this page. It contains all of the data used to make the tables and graphs, plus even more numbers. Please explore and share the data; it's all public!

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