Reduce Violent Crimes Committed Against Women and Children by 25% by the End of 2018

Overall Progress

23 %
Insufficient Progress

Female Homicides plus Juvenile Homicides

2013
97
Cases
2006
126
Cases
23.0% Decrease

Female Homicide Victims

2013
69
Victims
2006
76
Victims
9.2% Decrease

Youth Homicide Victims

2013
28
Victims
2006
50
Victims
44.0% Decrease
This site was last updated on April 3rd, 2014. Finalized 2013 violent crime data will be available in summer 2014.

Female Homicides plus Juvenile Homicides, 2006-2013

Female Homicide Victims

Youth Homicide Victims

Maps

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In-State Renewable Energy Generating Capacity (Actual and Projected)

In-State Renewable Energy Generating Capacity (Actual and Projected)

Are We Meeting Our Goals?

There is no such thing as a spare Marylander.  When the O’Malley-Brown Administration took office in 2006, they acted on this belief setting a goal to drive down violent crime 25 percent by 2012, compared to 2006 levels.  Together with the hardworking men and women of Maryland law enforcement, we have driven down juvenile homicides 44 percent since 2006 and female homicides 9 percent.  In total, we’ve driven down the key metric for this goal, the sum of juvenile and female homicides, 23 percent since 2006.

In 2013, the O’Malley-Brown Administration renewed their commitment to protecting women and children by setting a new goal.  Together, we will drive down violent crime against women and children an additional 25 percent by 2018, compared to 2012 levels.

Actions Taken Towards Goal

  • “Under-13 Initiative”: From 2007 to 2011, nearly 40 percent of the 115 juvenile homicide victims in Baltimore City had at least some prior contact with the Maryland Department of Juvenile Services (DJS).  In collaboration with StateStat, Baltimore City schools, and local and state agencies, DJS launched the Under-13 Initiative in Baltimore City in 2013 to better protect these at-risk youth.
  • DJS attributes the decline in juvenile homicides, of youth under their care, to more intense case supervision and providing the right services for these youth. 
  • In 2012, under the leadership of Lt. Governor Brown, Maryland took another step to protect victims of domestic violence.  Today, Marylanders who are forced to leave a job to escape the threat of domestic violence are eligible for unemployment insurance.
  • In 2011, The O’Malley-Brown Administration launched the Maryland Safe at Home Address Confidentiality Program (ACP) to provide free and confidential mail-forwarding services to domestic violence victims.  The ACP helps protect our most vulnerable citizens by adding an additional level of protection between the victim and the offender.
  • Together with the Maryland Network Against Domestic Violence (MNADV), we developed and implemented the Lethality Assessment Program (LAP) to identify and protect victims of domestic violence.  The first assessment of its kind in the nation, the LAP helps law enforcement and other first responders to identify domestic violence victims who are at risk of re-injury or death and connect them with community resources.  Today, over 100 municipal law enforcement offices statewide covering 99% of Maryland’s population use the LAP to protect victims of domestic violence.
  • In 2010, the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services (DPSCS) launched a new domestic violence supervision program to better track domestic violence offenders and protect victims.  Today, DPSCS monitors over 2,500 offenders each month providing closer supervision, notifying victims of any change to the offenders’ location or incarceration status, and more.

How Can I Get Involved?

  • To report a crime in progress, call 911.
  • Contact the Department of Juvenile Services if you are a provider of youth services.
  • Contact victim’s services resources (listed below in "Additional Information") if you or someone you know is a victim of a crime.
  • Read our biweekly reports on crime in Maryland.
  • All of StateStat’s data are publicly available. Feel free to explore all graphs and data. Leave comments in any one of the graphs below using the "Discuss" feature.
  • Use the Socrata Open Data API (SODA) to build applications with Maryland's data.

Additional Information

The following additional resources are available to Maryland citizens for preventing, tracking, and learning about violence against women and children: 

More Data

Here is the main backing data set for this page. It contains all of the data used to make the tables and graphs, plus even more numbers. Please explore and share the data; it's all public!

More Data

Here is the main backing data set for this page. It contains all of the data used to make the tables and graphs, plus even more numbers. Please explore and share the data; it's all public!